Australia’s Monsoon Deliverer

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Wondjina Australia

Cloud and rain spirits that deliver monsoons.

  • These spirits created the landscape and humans living on it. Talk about a God.
  • They painted their image on cave walls and entered a waterhole once they’ve found a place to die.
  • While the appearance of the Wondjina spirits vary, due to how they’ve painted themselves, they are more commonly known to have large upper bodies and heads. They have eyes and a nose…but no mouth.
  • A missing mouth is sometimes attributed to the fact of how powerful they may be. If they spoke, rain would never stop!
  • Their control of the weather only occurs when someone breaks the law. They’ll bring floods, lightning, and cyclone.

The Head Hopper: Narration 101

We’ve talked about multiple POVs and the importance of treating them with love; each character is a distinct person who has a unique personality worth sharing with the world. We’ve talked about having too many characters and working on who to cut from the cast; we know so many authors who have created beautiful narratives with more than two characters as their MCs…but sometimes it’s not done well.

Taking things in a different direction but still referring to multiple POVs, characters, and consistency…let’s talk about your choice in writing style (if you’re taking the route we are going to be starting a conversation for.)

Being a head hopper is fun! As the writer, you get to explore different minds and see your plot unfold in your tale through the lens of diverse brains. Sometimes, you explore a single mind for one chapter, then switch to a new persona in the next. You can even write from a completely unbiased point of view…

Okay, you already know what we’re seguing into: your narrator.

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It’s crucial to keep your narrating style consistent. Flopping between third omniscient to subjective/limited to objective to first person…all because it makes sense in the moment of the scene? No. Our brains hurt simply thinking about that. It’s a heavy example but it’s worth mentioning the most extreme of cases to get your editing eye trained on your work and how you’re choosing to narrate.

The question then becomes: Am I doing this?

If you are, you should further ask yourself which POV/narrator comes off the strongest of all. Whichever one it is: choose it. Stick with it. Rewrites are a pain but the goal, if this pertains to you, is to get the work recognized as worth for publication, so it’s worth the extra time…and love!

We believe in you!

Creature in the Waves

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TaniwhaNew Zealand

Beings that reside among dangerous currents, may be guardians or predators.

  • They live in deep pools, hiding out in rivers, dark caves or, the deepest of all pools…the sea! They like being in dangerous currents or giant waves!
  • Good? Bad? Both? They’re considered kaitiaki, or protective guardians, of people and places in some legends. However, if told through other legends, they’re depicted as monsters who steal/kidnap women to marry.
  • Taniwha loosely translates to shark species of the Proto-Oceanic word, “tanifa.”
  • So, shark species means it probably looks like a fish of some sort, right? Right! Depending on the body of water. It’s beensaid there are some taniwha that appear to be alligators. There are a few legends which describe the taniwha as a log.
  • If someone comes across a taniwha, they might turn into one after they pass.

Creature with the Flute

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PatupaiareheNew Zealand

Deep forest or mountain spirits that play enchanting flute music.

  • They’re sometimes hostile humans. Don’t worry, they won’t…harm you…? They use their flute to lure women into their hands to assault them and murder them.
  • Although the description above describes their homes to be in the forest or mountain, they can also exist in large guarded communities.
  • There isn’t just one…there is a society, based off of kinship. They don’t allow intruders to join their ranks. If anyone lingers amongst them, they won’t be very kind.
  • The spirits are hunters and gatherers and only go out during the twilight hours.
  • For their physical appearance, they have fair skin and light/red hair. Their size…varies on the legend.

Water Dog

This is the last creature of the Americas we are going to dive into. After this one, we will only have four mythological creatures left, all located in Oceania! Gah! Feels like just yesterday we were diving into the world of mythology.

What should we cover next?!


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Ahuizoti | Mexico

Aquatic canine creature with a tail-hand.

  • The fur on this hound clumps together to create spikes. Its hands are capable of manipulation, similar to humanoids.
  • It likes humans, particularly nails, eyes and teeth. Shield yourself!
  • You’ll find this creature near water. Any bodies of water. Caves near water. All of the above. As long as it’s near water.
  • If prey is spotted, it’ll use its unique tail to swipe them up and drown them.
  • Whoever is taken, their sacrificed to the rain god, supposedly.

Consistently Inconsistent

Anyone writing a novel should always remember: consistently consistent. From the basics like character names to heavy lore details that provide rich world-building.

Telling a linear story will make you, as the writer, feel better about your product. You’ll feel encouraged to share your story more so than before.

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In order to write consistently within the words, planning is necessary. We are definitely a broken record when it comes to this topic, but that should prove how important the process of planning out your novel really is. We’re talking plot outlines, world outlines, character bios, etc. All of these are needed to create the base of your novel. If you’re not incorporating mapping time, you’re not going to write a consistent story. You’ll end up writing ten different inconsistencies and your book will never see a virtual shelf. Ever. If you need to research, take time during this stage of your writing to get the gist of it. Relating your world to the reader’s will build the bond everyone wants to have with their favorite books.

Once writing has begun to unfold, your writing style for the novel at stake should remain relatively consistent (unless it’s part of the storyline…then do what you must! Just do it in a cohesive manner.) Tone with the narrator and characters shouldn’t change throughout the novel unless tragedy strikes and alters their perspectives. The plot can change slightly, as you uncover more during the writing process, but if it’s drastic…return to your outlines. You can easily incorporate these new changes in your story; it’ll also help you see where the changes will begin to morph the rest of the tale and avoid any inconsistencies!

The 13th Child

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Jersey Devil | New Jersey, USA

Hooved creature with bat-like wings and a blood-chilling scream.

  • It lives in the Pine Barrens in South New Jersey but is also considered a mythological creature talked about in Philadelphia.
  • It’s always described to be a flying biped with hooves. The combination vary: kangaroos, wyverns, goats, and horses are some of them.
  • The Jersey Devil started as The Leeds Devil, also the Devil of Leeds. These names originated in the 1700s about a family (the Leeds) and a crazy story surrounding Mother Leeds. Mother Leeds had 12 children and fell pregnant with a 13th child. She wasn’t exactly the happiest expecting mother. She decided to curse the 13th child, saying it would be born as the ‘Devil.’ Supposedly, the Jersey Devil is the 13th child.
  • Although the Jersey Devil was born in the 1700s, publications and sightings didn’t begin until the 1800s. As time went on, the name changed into the Jersey Devil. But the story still remains.
  • None of the stories say its attacked humans or has any reason to…but it will rampage through towns and cities, if it wants to.

On Location

It’s not in everyone’s best interest to sit in their home office to write. Works for some, not for the rest. A few may take a ride in their car to a local place they find inspirational. Others take a hit to the wallet and hop on a place to their most relaxing destination. The purpose isn’t to escape the process of writing, but lay the seed of inspiration and nourish it with the surrounding scenery.

Is anyone a location-inspired writer? If so, where do you like to write?

Coffee shops?

The beach in a comfy chair with your toes in the sand?

In a hotel with a magical view of snow-capped mountains?

Local park?

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The Jungle Dwarf

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Curupira Brazil

Jungle genie with bright red hair and backwards feet.

  • Curupira is a blend of West African and European fairies, and was once considered a demon.
  • The name comes from the Tupi language, which translates to covered in blisters.
  • You’ll be able to spot this creature from a mile away. He has bright red/orange hair, usually resembles a man or dwarf, and has feet turned backward.
  • How can this little guy be threatening? He creates illusions and produces sounds to drive their victim to go crazy.
  • Don’t worry…they only go after poachers and hunters; those who take from the jungle they live in.

Mother of the Mountain

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Madremonte Columbia

Forest mother that protects flora and fauna from mankind.

  • The mother of the mountain has been described as an elegant woman who wears moss and leaves with a green hat to conceal her face.
  • You’ll find her living in the jungle and whenever she bathes in a river, her presence will cause flooding and heavy storms.
  • Her motive lies within protection. She will haunt those who steal land and casts plagues on those who fall under that realm.
  • She also dislikes unfaithful spouses, vagabonds, and other types of problem makers. When these people walk through her forest, they’ll encounter numerous obstacles to wear them down and force them to sleep for many hours on end.
  • She’s also compared to that of Mother Nature.